DSC02044.jpg

DSC02044.jpg
By do small things with great love on 2015-03-01 12:40:45
tags

Sweet 16 Year Old Birthday Party – Vancouver, BC

Sweet 16 Year Old Birthday Party – Vancouver, BC
By Kris Krug on 2014-02-08 07:46:03
tags

photo

the makeup Photo
tags
By ivanovgood from Pixabay

bride and groom

the groom
taken in San Miguel de Allende
By teactiva on 2013-02-23 18:31:15
tags

Jesse Sweet 16_028

Jesse Sweet 16_028
Jesse’s Sweet 16 Birthday and dinner
By upwiththemooses on 2011-11-08 07:37:07
tags

DSC02368

DSC02368
By do small things with great love on 2015-04-30 18:37:20
tags

Ocean’s 8

Ocean’s 8

Five years, eight months, 12 days…and counting. That’s how long Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock) has been devising the biggest heist of her life. She knows what it’s going to take—a team of the best in their field, starting with her partner-in-crime Lou Miller (Cate Blanchett). Together, they recruit a crew of specialists: jeweler Amita (Mindy Kaling); street con Constance (Awkwafina); expert fence Tammy (Sarah Paulson); hacker Nine Ball (Rihanna); and fashion designer Rose (Helena Bonham Carter). The target is a cool $150 million dollars in diamonds—diamonds that will be around the neck of world-famous actress Daphne Kluger (Anne Hathaway), who will be centerstage at the event of the year, the Met Gala. The plan is rock solid, but everything will need to be flawless if the team is going to get in and get away with the ice. All in plain sight.

Bride and groom

the Groom
Éjele, I grabbed here into the scene… hehe. They were in the bed of the river Kano that crosses Numazu
By Furumaru on 2007-02-26 01:52:02
tags

Image from page 16 of “Our new guide to rose culture : 1891” (1891)

Image from page 16 of “Our new guide to rose culture : 1891” (1891)
Identifier: ournewguidetoros18ding
Title: Our new guide to rose culture : 1891
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: Dingee & Conard Co Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection
Subjects: Nursery stock Catalogs Roses Catalogs Nurseries (Horticulture) Bulbs (Plants) Seeds Catalogs Vegetables Seeds Catalogs Flowers Seeds Catalogs
Publisher: West Grove, Pa. : The Dingee & Conard Co.
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
r ispure white, and both flowers and buds have anabundance of lovely deep green moss. 50 cts.;Two-year* size, $1. SPECIAL OFFER.—The set of 7 named abovefor $2.75. Two-year size and larger, set of 7 for $4.75-*Two-year Roses must generally be sent by Express. PRICE, 30 CTS. harness rgsgs^- The Moss Rose is a strong, vigorous grower, PER-FECTLY HARDY, and therefore justly esteemed as verydesirable for out-door culture in open ground. Mostvarieties bloom but once in the season, and usually notthe first year, but the flowers and buds are very largeand handsome; they remain in bloom a long time, andare highly prized wherever beautiful Roses are known.Moss Roses like rich ground and are much improved inbeauty and fragrance by liberal manuring and goodcutivation, but they bear hardships and neglect well, andalways bloom profusely. The price of Moss Roses is 20 cts. each ; 5 for $1:4he set of 14 varieties for $2.75. Two-year size, 40 cts.■sach ; set of 14 for $4.50, by Express. See over.

Text Appearing After Image:
GLORY OF MOSSES (BUDS). 20 THE DINGEE & CONARD CO.S GENERAL COLLECTION—MOSS ROSES. Captain Ingram.—Brilliant carmine ; large full flowers, very double and mossy. 20 cts.Elizabeth Rowe.—Bright satiny pink, very large and double, fragrant and finely mossed. 20 cts.Etna Moss.—One of the finest, very large and full, delightfully fragrant; color, bright crimson, shaded purple; very mossy. 20 cts.Glory of Mosses.—A magnificent Moss Rose; extra large and perfectly double; color, deep rosy carmine, shaded purplish crimson; very mossy and fragrant, one of the finest. 20 cts.Henry Martin.—Rich glossy pink, elegantly tinged with crimson ; large globular flowers; very full and sweet, finely mossed. 20 cts.Hortense Vernet.—Fine rosy carmine ; large, full and sweet; buds beautifully mossed. 20 cts.Luxembourg.—Bright crimson scarlet; large double; very sweet and mossy; one of the finest. 20 cts.Lanei.—Large, bold flowers, very double, full and fragrant; color, rich crimson, del

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
By Internet Archive Book Images on 1891-01-01 00:00:00
tags

Image from page 1289 of “The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade” (1885)

Image from page 1289 of “The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade” (1885)
Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade
Identifier: americanfloristw4515amer
Year: 1885 (1880s)
Authors: American Florists Company
Subjects: Floriculture; Florists
Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
12 4 The American Florist. Jan. i, New York. EXCELLENT CHRISTMAS BUSINESS. A local cartoonist portrays "Santa Claus," reposing in deep slumber, his empty pack hangs from the bed-post, his fur-lined coat, boots and gloves are variously distributed about the room, just as a very tired man is apt to dis- tribute his clothes on retiring. "All In" is the title the clever cartoonist has given to the picture,-and it is ap- propriate. It has been a great Christ- mas celebration, but it is "all in." There may be sounds of revelry by night, but they do not penetrate the precinct of the wholesale cut flower district, where our "den" is located. The wholesalers and their assistants have gone and so have the flowers. Without making extravagant claims, it can be stated that business was ex- cellent, and so far as we can learn, gave general satisfaction. A number, both wholesalers and retailers, have stated that business was better than they expected it to be. There are peo- ple who, when confronted with figures showing great increase in wealth, are prone to ask that disagreeable ques- tion : "Who has it?" It is not within our scope to furnish an answer or an analysis, but to state facts as we see them. The weather of the week end- ing with Christmas day was fine throughout, which was favorable alike to all concerned in the business, as well as to the public. The continued bad weather of the previous week had caused some anxiety relative to an adequate supply of stock, which was happily dispelled. While there was no surplus, there was enough to supply the demand. If any stock was left over, it was on account of a miscalcu- lation on the part of the dealer in fix- ing too high a price. Prices were high and were expected to be, but there was a limit, beyond which some of the buy- ers would not go. Red roses and red carnations, particularly the latter, were the scarcest in quantities. Red roses, depending on variety, wholesaled at the rate of $40 to $75 per 100, red car- nations at from $12 to $15 per 100. Special roses such as Ward, Stanley and Ophelia, brought from $20 to $25 per 100. American Beauties brought $100 per 100 and more was asked but we believe that but few went above that figure. There were American Beauties on the market of inferior qual- ity that went at lower prices. It may be added that on Christmas eve, the stock of red carnations was completely sold out. White carnations brought, if good, $6 per 100. Enchantress, $S; Ward and fancies, $8 and $10. These are conservative quotations for fresh stock; there were carnations that sold for $4 per 100. Good single violets were not plentiful and went readily at $1.50 per 100 and upward. Some deal- ers started double violets at $1.50 and $1.75 per 100, but the demand was not sufficient to warrant those figures and prices dropped to $1 and $1.25 and even lower, as violets were being sold on the streets on Christmas day. Good cattleya orchids brought $60 and $75 per 100 at the start, ranging down to $.30 and $35 for small and inferior blooms. In the whole range of prices, considering how-they sold a short time ago, orchids were about the cheapest things on the market. There was an abundance of lilies and lily of the val- ley, and considering the complaints that came out early in the fall about a scarcity of Paper White bulbs, there was a considerable stock of it on the market. The price was $2.75 per 100 and upward. Lilies brought about $10 per 100; lily of the valley, $4 to $5. Gardenias, as they have been through– out the fall, were rather scarce and brought $5 and $6 per dozen. Good cut pansies are factors in this market and brought $z per 100; ■ ■ • Of poinset- ? OUR MOTTO: The Best the Market Affords. VALLEY From Cold Storage. New York or Chicago. $16.00 per 1000; $8.60 per 600; * $4.50 per 260 Pins. * $4.50 per 260 Pips % CHAS. SCHWAKE & CO., Inc., 90-92 West Broadway, New York $ B E THE MONTREAL FLORAL EXCHANGE, Ltd. 140 Manfield Street – Montreal The Wholesale Commission House of Canada, Featuring the Products of Its Best Growers =n tias, there was a considerable stock, but there seems to be room for an in- ventor to devise some means for get- ting them to market in more presenta- ble shape. They ranged from $2 to $4 per dozen. Buying in the wholesale district became really active on the morning of December 24, and contin- ued throughout the day and night, buyers from all the big retail stores and many of the smaller ones, being seen in the street after midnight, as all the wholesale stores were open. By Christmas morning there was little of anything that was good left in the wholesale district. As will be else- where noted, the retail stores were well stocked with plants and had fine busi- ness. Though many of them had good business in cut flowers, it was but nat- ural that they should push plants while they lasted. A number of retailers were completely sold out of plants be- fore the evening of December 24, and could get no relief by telephoning to the growers as they were in the same boat. Some retailers were helped out by neighbors in the business and it is pleasing to note that in this great city being neighborly is not one of the lost arts. December 27.—^While buying was rather light today, so were arrivals of stock. Prices were firm, but it is dif- ficult to forecast conditions for the re- mainder of the week. There is a scarc- ity of short roses, for these are what 75 per cent of the buyers want. It is no secret that some of the wholesalers were "stuck" with special or long- stemmed roses. The plain people, whom God loves, because he made so many of them, could not buy roses at 20 and 25 cents per flower. The out- look for the remainder of the week is uncertain. If one may judge by for- mer years, at the corresponding period, business will be dull. NOTES. A man who is now out of the busi- ness (perhaps this is one of the rea- sons he got out) once told the writer that he did not consider it news that a man sold good stock. Well, it should be to a man who wants to buy. It would be impossible to mention all the good stock seen during Christmas week, but some of it is here recalled. Traendly & Schenck, 436 Fifth ave- nue, were particularly strong on such roses as Alice Stanley, Ward, Ophelia, Sunburst and others. They also had a fine stock of orchids. In the Coogan building, Sixth avenue and 26th street, much good stock was noticed. Paul Meconi, who has a store on the ground floor, had a fine stock of roses, orchids, carnations and other flowers and sold out well. Combinations of flowerine- and foli- age plants, fine wreaths and other sea-

Text Appearing After Image:
John Young & Co. Wholesale Commission Florists 53 W. 28th St., NEW YORK Telepbone 7362 Madison Square. WILUAMP. FORD WHOLESALE FLORIST 107 W. 28th St., New York Telephone, 5336 Farratrut sonable decorations were noteworthy in the large hotels. Of these, the work at the Knickerbocker, Broadway and 42d street, deserves special men- tion. F. F. Salinger is the clever flor- ist at this hotel, and his work was much admired. William P. Ford, 107 West 28th street, had a very fine stock of red roses. In sweet peas, bouvardias and various other features, he came out strong and had a fine business. Peter Beauerlin, of Elmhurst, L. I., a well known grower, had the misfor- tune December 24, to have a fire in his range, which destroyed two houses, filled with valuable stock. In addition to a great sale of plants, M. A. Bowe, 6 East 33d street, had a fine business in cut flowers. He has also recently been filling larp-e orders for funeral work. In the New York Cut Flower Com- pany’s rooms, Moore, Hentz & Nash were well supplied with American Beauties and other good roses.

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
By Internet Archive Book Images on 1885-01-01 00:00:00
tags